The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

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Notes from the Field: Priya Sankar '19

Priya Sankar ’19 interned with the Brookings Institution for the Spring 2017 term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

Welcome Class of 2021

Students who come to the Rockefeller Center find a home, mentors, and engaged peers.

The Rockefeller Center has a specially designed First-Year Fellows program for the Class of 2021 that begins by taking Public Policy 5 in the winter term of 2018. Public Policy 5 is the introductory course in the Public Policy minor, which allows students to customize their own interdisciplinary plan of study around an important public policy area that they define, such as health, education, the environment, leadership, law, poverty, or urban issues.

There are additional programs open to first-year students, such as Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors, Student Discussion Groups, and Peer Mentoring.

Notes from the Field: Katherine Royce ’19

Katherine Royce ’19 interned with EcoHealth Alliance (EHA) for the Spring 2017 term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

During the spring of 2017, I completed a health and policy internship with EcoHealth Alliance (EHA), a nonprofit research organization which uses the principles of local conservation and scientific inquiry to protect global health from the emergence of disease. By researching the interfaces between human, wildlife, and environmental health, EHA develops science and policy methods to prevent pandemics. I was assigned to work with the Blue Ribbon Study Panel on Biodefense to review the U.S. effort to strengthen national biodefense. In 2015, the Panel issued a set of recommendations to Congress, with the goal of improving U.S. capacity to prevent and respond to outbreaks of infectious disease, whether naturally occurring or intentionally introduced. During my internship, I assisted the Panel in researching how these recommendations had been implemented by federal and state governments and the agricultural industry, and my work will appear in its forthcoming report.

Turning Your Passion Into Your Living with a Liberal Arts Degree

On Friday, August 4th, the Rockefeller Center hosted a one-day conference entitled “How to Make Your Passion Your Living with a Liberal Arts Degree.” The purpose of the conference was to help students learn how to translate their interests into careers that have meaning and impact.

Puja Devi ’19 values a liberal arts degree “because it encourages me to both delve into my interests as well as explore fields I might not favor as much.” Even though she is a government major, she has taken classes in sociology and women’s and gender studies, studied abroad in India, and is currently searching for research projects in geography.

The conference featured remarks from Rebecca Biron, Dean of the College, about the versatility of a liberal arts degree as well as six young alumni.

Rey Allie ’11 studied Government and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies. He has developed insights to help Uber expand into new markets across the world, expanded the scope and reach of Google’s Intelligence and Investigations team, and currently advises senior leaders on strategic initiatives and opportunities at OfferUp.

Notes from the Field: Alexandrea Adams ’18

Alexandrea Adams ’18 interned with New America, a non-partisan think tank in Washington, D.C., for the Spring 2017 term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

Perkins Bass Distinguished Visitor Lew Feldstein Talks About Social Capital

Lewis Feldstein, the Rockefeller Center 2016-2017 Perkins Bass Distinguished Visitor, delivered the Perkins Bass 1934 Lecture on Tuesday, August 1 entitled “Viewing the World Through a Social Capital Lens: Who You Know Matters, Community Building Counts.”

Notes from the Field: Sydney Latimore '18

Sydney Latimore ’18 interned in the European Parliament branch in Brussels, Belgium for the 2017 Winter term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

Over the course of the winter 2017 term, I had the opportunity to intern with the European Parliament branch in Brussels, Belgium. In the first week I was tossed into the melee of preparation for the monthly trip to Strasbourg, France where Members of Parliament (MEPs) travel to meet and vote on legislative proposals. I quickly learned how my work fit into the larger mission of Parliament and I was just as quickly introduced to the complexities of a governing body that is responsible for 28 unique countries.

Students from Exeter Academy Visit Dartmouth

The Rockefeller Center hosted 27 students from Phillip Exeter Academy’s Charles J. Hamm Leadership Program on Wednesday, July 19. Students in the Exeter Summer Program live on campus in Exeter, New Hampshire for five weeks and participate in academic studies, athletics, and personal exploration. Of the 27 students in the Hamm Leadership Program this summer, 12 of the students are international.

The Hamm Leadership Program features excursions across New England to learn about leadership outside of the classroom. While visiting the Rockefeller Center, the students participated in a campus tour, scavenger hunt, and small group discussions. There was also a panel of Dartmouth students who shared their experiences about college life. Sadhana Hall, Deputy Director of the Rockefeller Center, presented on authenticity and leadership qualities. All activities focused on leadership in action.

Faculty Research Grants in Action: Donna Coch

Original article by Charlotte Albright was published in the Dartmouth News on July 25, 2017.

When, in the nursery rhyme, Jack and Jill go up a hill, they’re teaching children more than how to fetch a pail of water. They’re also improving their reading skills.

Researchers have found a connection between knowing how words rhyme and knowing how to read them. Good rhymers tend to become good readers. But there’s more to be known about what, exactly, occurs in our brains when we encounter two words that sound alike. For example, what happens if we are shown the pictures of, say, a cat and a hat, rather than the word themselves?

That’s what Professor of Education Donna Coch and her undergraduate lab assistants are learning from an experiment they’re conducting at the Reading Brains Lab in the Department of Education. Supported by funds from the Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy, the study asks participants—about 80 college students—to make decisions about whether pairs of words do or do not rhyme.

“Do you want to try it?” Coch asked me.

“Sure,” I said, hoping that as a 66-year-old avid reader, I wouldn’t embarrass myself.

Notes from the Field: Samuel Emmah ’18

Samuel Emmah ’18 interned in the Office of the Public Defender in Hartford, Connecticut for the 2017 Winter term. The following is an excerpt from his internship report.

This past winter, I was able to intern in the Office of the Public Defender in Hartford, Connecticut which provides legal representation to indigent clients of the surrounding Hartford metropolitan area who are at risk of a prison sentence. As a leader in public defender work, the state of Connecticut directly funds the public defender’s office to utilize dedicated attorneys, investigators, and social workers to ensure the protection and enforcement of a defendant’s constitutional rights. In Connecticut, the superior courts are separated into a GA court, which handles misdemeanors and lower class felonies, and a JD court, which provides representation to clients facing higher-class felonies.

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