The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

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Student Facilitators Prepare for DLAB

How do you guide a small group of first-year students through conversations about values and exercises that facilitate self-reflection, especially when these topics can quickly become personal and controversial? Each year’s cohort of student facilitators for the Dartmouth Leadership Attitude and Behaviors (DLAB) program prepare to do just that through an intensive facilitation training program.  

Structured in a way that allows facilitators to experience an abbreviated version of each DLAB session, the training takes place the week before the program begins in January.

Engaging With the Center: The Dartmouth College Public Service Legacy Project

When he was a student in the late 1920s, Nelson A. Rockefeller ’30 helped the nearby town of White River Junction recover from the Great Vermont Flood of 1927. His only request was to not be featured in any newspaper or other media article because his father, John D. Rockefeller, discouraged such publicity. Unearthing a little-known anecdote such as this one, connects undergraduate students to Nelson Rockefeller—a public figure who went on to contribute his wisdom, energy, and resources to the nation as a governor and vice president.

The Rockefeller Center was dedicated in September of 1983 in honor of Nelson Rockefeller. At the same time, his Class of 1930 dedicated a wall in the Center that recognizes all Dartmouth alumni and alumnae who have served in public office with a plaque bearing the individuals’ names and service.

Melissa Dunham '17 Attends the American Geophysical Union’s 2017 Fall Meeting

Attending the American Geophysical Union’s (AGU) 2017 Fall Meeting as an undergraduate was a priceless, unique, and inspiring experience that I will take with me through my journey as a geoscientist. There were ample poster sessions, enlightning talks, technical presentations, and keynote lectures, including one entitled “How Geoscientists Can Change the World”.

With the over 20,000 scientists that attended AGU’s 2017 Fall Meeting, there were no limitations to learning and networking. Not only was I able to present my ongoing senior thesis research to geoscientists from all reaches of the globe, but I was also exposed to how the global scientific community interacts, communicates, shares, and expands knowledge first hand.

In addition, I was also able to network further with fellow undergraduate and graduate students as well as with professionals from organizations such as NASA, USGS, NOAA, and the US Naval Academy in an exhibition hall setting. As a result of attending AGU’s 2017 Fall Meeting, I truly feel a part of the greater scientific community and understand how my research can directly contribute to future scientific discoveries.

Class of 2020 First-Year Fellow: Alex Rounaghi ‘20

Alex Rounaghi '20 grew up in Laguna Beach, California where he graduated from Laguna Beach High School. In high school, he worked as Senator Feinstein’s U.S. Senate Page, served as the Secretary-General of the Model United Nations program, and founded Safe Rides Laguna Beach, a program that allows teenagers to have a safe ride home instead of driving in unsafe conditions. He also was involved in student government as Class President and received the award for Top Achievement in the Social Studies department. His passion for criminal justice began with his time as a Juvenile Justice Commissioner for Orange County.

At Dartmouth, Alex plans to major in Government and minor in Public Policy and possibly Urban Studies. He is involved in Great Issues Scholars, College Democrats, and the Dartmouth Law Journal.

As a First-Year Fellow, Alex interned in the Chambers of Judge John Mott ’81 at the District of Columbia Superior Court. As a judicial intern, he was primarily responsible for drafting legal orders for the judge to review and submit as well as researching certain legal issues on which he would write legal memorandums for the judge and clerk. 

Vibhor Khanna​ '19 Attends Techcrunch Disrupt Berlin

At Techcrunch Disrupt Berlin, a conference that brings together revolutionary startups and entrepreneurs, I was able to learn from experts in the fields of artificial intelligence, machine learning, autonomous vehicles, cryptocurrencies, financial technology, and robotics. Such insight taught me more about their respective industries and how these innovative technologies will develop in the future, as well as new applications of these technologies. As an example, I was able to hear from Alexander Zosel, the founder of Volocopter, a prominent German startup creating the first electric air taxis, about his vision for the future of mobility. Hearing directly from the people who are driving change in the world is incredibly inspiring, but was also a reminder of the amount of hard work that goes behind making these startups successful.

Josh Tupler ’16 Reflects on His Experience with RGLP

Current Rockefeller Global Leadership Program (RGLP) Student Program Assistant, Soham Basu '20 interviewed alum Josh Tupler ’16 about his RGLP experience. RGLP seeks to help participants build their intercultural leadership competencies. Tupler initially got involved with RGLP because he was interested in traveling abroad and saw this program as an excellent opportunity to prepare for this experience. Through the lessons and practical seminars, RGLP provided Tupler with the resources and skills to thrive on the Government Foreign Study Program at the London School of Economics and Political Science. Tupler reflects on the impact of his RGLP experience at Dartmouth.

Soham Basu (SB): How did your perception of the program differ from its reality?

Josh Tupler (JT): I went in expecting a weekly dinner meeting arrangement that a lot of other on-campus activities had, but I came out very surprised at the level of engagement and interaction with speakers. From giving us their emails and cell phone numbers to taking an active interest in our academic lives and careers, it exceeded any expectations that I had.

Ursula Jongebloed '18 Presents Her Research at the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting

This December, I attended the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting in New Orleans, Louisiana. The AGU Fall meeting is a fantastic opportunity for undergraduate and graduate students to present their research as well as learn about the vast amount of research being performed at other institutions.

I presented the preliminary findings of my undergraduate thesis research in the form of a poster at the conference. My thesis explores how the elevation and location of where ice cores are collected affects the concentration of heavy metal pollution in the ice core samples. Ice cores can serve as an indicator for atmospheric processes, such as pollution, so the concentrations of metals in ice cores can reflect the relative amount of atmospheric metal pollution at a site.

Class of 2020 First-Year Fellow: Alexandrea Gosnell ‘20

Alexandrea Gosnell ’20 comes from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and graduated from Julia R. Masterman High School as an AP Scholar with Distinction. At Masterman, Alexandrea served as the Co-President of the National Spanish Honor Society and worked as a tutor helping local middle school students. She was also a dedicated member of the Philadelphia Photo Arts Center (PPAC) Teen Program.

At Dartmouth, Alexandrea plans to major in History. She is involved with Link Up, and America Reads, which reflects her commitment to education and female empowerment.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Charlotte Blatt '18

This series introduces the 2017-2018 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

Throughout my Dartmouth career, I have held various positions and participated in several programs that have allowed me to both demonstrate and learn about leadership. In particular, as President of Dartmouth College Democrats during the 2016 general election, I was at the helm of an organization tasked with helping to turn out the Dartmouth campus and wider Hanover community to vote for Hillary Clinton, Maggie Hassan, and Democrats up and down the ballot. After this experience, I wanted to delve deeper into leadership training to improve my skills at facilitation, public speaking, and organizational management.

Sam Gochman '18 Attends the First Ivy League Undergraduate Research Symposium

As a presenter at the first Ivy League Undergraduate Research Symposium, I had the privilege of joining a group of students who brought with them powerful ideas. At Dartmouth, there is a diversity of exploratory research that enriches both our community and the greater world. I was proud to bring some of that work to an event that hosted students who also represented their esteemed institutions.

The symposium welcomed 135 students from all of the Ivy League schools, showing that we are all together in the effort to learn about the world around us in so many different ways. Research topics ranged from cellular nanoengineering to new uses of CRISPR, x-ray spectromicroscopy to quantum superconducting circuits, social associations of dolphins to arthropod assemblages, sexual risk-taking to conscientiousness and mindfulness, and social change in Chile to education emancipation. It was important to be exposed to and learn from students in a variety disciplines. Some of the most powerful projects were those which I would have never seen as a STEM major.

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