The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Class of 2018

Rocky and Me: Niamé Daffé '18 Senior Reflection

In the Rocky & Me series, Seniors reflect on their experiences during their time at Dartmouth.

Notes from the Field: Rachel Favors '18

Rachel Favors '18 interned with the U.S. Department of State Office of West African Affairs for the Summer 2017 term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This summer, I interned at the U.S. Department of State Office of West African Affairs. The U.S. Department of State advances U.S. foreign policy priorities and represents the interests of the American people by working to shape a more peaceful, stable, and democratic world. As an intern on the Nigeria desk in the Office of West African Affairs, I supported U.S. engagement with the Nigerian government and people to strengthen democracy and good governance in Nigeria, to support the country’s economic growth, to advance peace and security in the areas besieged by Boko Haram and ISIS West-Africa, and to promote widespread opportunity and development in Nigerian society.

Rocky and Me: Kaina Chen ’18 Senior Reflection

In the Rocky & Me series, Seniors reflect on their experiences during their time at Dartmouth.

Notes from the Field: Rebecca Brownell '18

Rebecca Brownell '18 interned with the Washington, D.C. Office of Senator Kirsten Gillibrand for the Summer 2017 term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This summer, I had the incredible opportunity to intern in the Washington, D.C. Office of Senator Kirsten Gillibrand from New York. I gained experience working in legislation, constituent affairs, the daily operations of a senatorial office, as well as developing relationships with Hill staffers and Dartmouth alumni in the capitol.

Becoming well-informed in American politics and working on behalf of the senator was certainly a satisfying way of putting my academic work as a Government major into practice. The past few months with a new administration’s legislative agenda also created a controversial and chaotic D.C. environment, which ultimately provided me a particularly exciting and busy office atmosphere in which to work.

Notes from the Field: Megan Mounts '18 

Megan Mounts '18 interned with the U.S. Embassy at Bridgetown, Barbados​ for the Summer 2017 term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

My summer internship experience was facilitated through the United States Department of State Intern Program. I served in the Public Affairs Section at the U.S. Embassy at Bridgetown, Barbados. The Section is part of the Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs. The Embassy mission is to promote U.S.-Eastern Caribbean relations in sustainable economic growth, good governance, and support of a vibrant civil society. The Embassy is unique in that it also serves six other island nations. The Public Affairs Section promotes mutual understandings through education and cultural programs. U.S. professionals and artists are invited to the region to engage with local communities. There is strong support for science, technology, and leadership with young learners. U.S. higher institutions are promoted to college-aged students. The Section controls all Embassy social media outlets, and monitors media releases from local sources to interpret political and economic perceptions of U.S. policies in the region.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Julian Marcu ’18

This series introduces the 2017-2018 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

In our increasingly globalized world, what it means to be a leader in the 21st century is vastly different than what it meant in previous eras. Originally, the “ideal leader” was one that could efficiently organize and motivate a group around a common goal to achieve a desired objective. However, this conception would imply that the leader and the team exist in a vacuum. Today, as a global community, we realize that the independent actions of individuals, groups, organizations, businesses, and governments can have far reaching effects on people all over the world.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Charlotte Blatt '18

This series introduces the 2017-2018 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

Throughout my Dartmouth career, I have held various positions and participated in several programs that have allowed me to both demonstrate and learn about leadership. In particular, as President of Dartmouth College Democrats during the 2016 general election, I was at the helm of an organization tasked with helping to turn out the Dartmouth campus and wider Hanover community to vote for Hillary Clinton, Maggie Hassan, and Democrats up and down the ballot. After this experience, I wanted to delve deeper into leadership training to improve my skills at facilitation, public speaking, and organizational management.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Chris Huberty '18

This series introduces the 2017-2018 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

I began studying leadership during my first year in high school and have intensively studied it several times since. Despite my relatively lengthy immersion in leadership studies, I find that leadership means something slightly different to me each time I reflect on it. Thus, many of the particular aspects of leadership that interest me have changed, and I suspect this trend will continue as I grow older and further develop my own leadership style. Leadership is a broad topic, yet I have been able to study it from many angles to improve my own leadership style.

Notes from the Field: Charlotte Kamin '18

Charlotte Kamin '18 interned with the Institute for the Study of War (ISW) for the Summer 2017 term. The following is an excerpt from her internship report.

This summer, I served as an Iraq research analyst intern with the Institute for the Study of War (ISW). ISW is a non-partisan think tank in Washington D.C. that researches and analyzes the political and security conditions abroad to better inform the American public and to influence U.S. strategy and policy in critical regions. ISW conducts rigorous open-source research in order to provide accurate and timely intelligence on developing military operations, enemy threats, and socio-political realities in key regions like the Middle East and Central Asia.

Rockefeller Leadership Fellow: Dan Propp '18

This series introduces the 2017-2018 Rockefeller Leadership Fellows. Each fellow reflects on why he or she wanted to be a part of the program and what aspects of leadership most interests them.

As far as aspects of leadership, I am interested in how leaders can help individuals and groups reach their full potential. Additionally, I am interested in the capacity of effective leadership to bring about cultural shifts; a good leader can lead a group successfully to a goal, but a great leader can completely change a dialogue.

For me, being a RLF is largely a chance to meet student leaders who I find inspiring. The group consists of a number of fantastically intelligent and charismatic individuals, and I look forward not only to learning from them, but also growing alongside them.

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