The Nelson A. Rockefeller Center for Public Policy and the Social Sciences

Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors

Welcome Class of 2021

Students who come to the Rockefeller Center find a home, mentors, and engaged peers.

The Rockefeller Center has a specially designed First-Year Fellows program for the Class of 2021 that begins by taking Public Policy 5 in the winter term of 2018. Public Policy 5 is the introductory course in the Public Policy minor, which allows students to customize their own interdisciplinary plan of study around an important public policy area that they define, such as health, education, the environment, leadership, law, poverty, or urban issues.

There are additional programs open to first-year students, such as Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors, Student Discussion Groups, and Peer Mentoring.

Rocky and Me: Deep Singh '17 Senior Reflection

In the Rocky & Me series, Seniors reflect on their experiences during their time at Dartmouth.

Introducing Eric Janisch, Rockefeller Center Program Officer

Eric Janisch is the Rockefeller Center’s newest Program Officer, having joined the Center’s staff in January of 2017. As a Program Officer for Co-Curricular Programs, Eric contributes as a co-manager to both the Management and Leadership Development Program (MLDP) and the Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors program (D-LAB) and aids in organizing a variety of public programs – including the Rocky Student Veteran lunch as well as the campus visit by the 22nd Secretary of the Army, Eric Fanning.

Eric is also working to organize a vocational seminar over sophomore summer through the Professional Preparation Program (P3). Specifically, he is helping connect students with likeminded alumni who have non-traditional career paths they reached after completing traditional liberal arts majors.

“We’re hoping to give them an understanding of what they can do outside of the normal corporate culture or traditional industries,” said Eric.

Recognizing Rockefeller Center Student Program Assistant: Emily Robertson '18

Emily Robertson ’18, a History major, discovered her passion for leading and guiding students through her involvement with the Rockefeller Center’s Dartmouth Leadership Attitudes and Behaviors (D-LAB) program specifically designed for first-year students. D-LAB participants have the opportunity to bond with peers of different values and backgrounds and connect with their upper-class facilitators through reflective and interactive activities.

Emily is grateful that her writing professor initially suggested that she apply to facilitate D-LAB. She knew of Emily’s strong interest in mentoring first-year students, and thought it would be a good fit for her. During her sophomore fall term, Emily served as a student facilitator. The experience provided her a meaningful leadership role on campus, and extended her passion for leading others to the classroom.

“I loved going through D-LAB as a facilitator because of the leadership skills the program teaches,” says Emily. “I found my passion in the message and values D-LAB introduces to first-years.”

Hassan Hassen ’18 Named Pickering Fellow

Hassan Hassen ’18, a sociology major from Marietta, Ga., has been named a Thomas R. Pickering Foreign Affairs Fellow—one of 10 undergraduates from across the country selected by the U.S. State Department-funded program for students from diverse backgrounds who are interested in U.S. Foreign Service careers.

The fellowship, administered by The Washington Center, provides two years of financial support and mentoring as Hassen completes his Dartmouth degree. It also offers internships at the U.S. Department of State and an overseas posting at a U.S. embassy.

Hassen is aiming for a career in the Foreign Service as an economic officer specializing in international trade, economic development, and energy.

“I hope to use the fellowship to gain a deeper understanding of the global economy and of what policy measures can facilitate more conducive economic environments that will lead to sustainable impacts on the lives of people through an increase in foreign and domestic investments, wages, and jobs,” he says.

DLAB Leadership in Practice

The 2017 D-LAB program concluded with session 6, titled “Leadership in Practice.” The focus of this session was to allow participants the opportunity to reflect on ways to apply their values to different campus organizations. The session was structured differently from past sessions; participants first met with their groups, then all participants mingled with representatives from campus organizations.

In the first part of the session, participants discussed how they could use the lessons learned from D-LAB in their lives at Dartmouth. Participants talked about how the discussions of values helped them identify which values they prioritize and values they may want to focus on. Facilitators encouraged students to think about how the activities they are involved with could help them prioritize certain values and interests.

DLAB Leadership for Others, Part II

The focus of session five, titled “Leadership for Others (Part II),” of D-LAB was on community concerns at Dartmouth. Participants came to the session having reflected on what problems or campus issues they have seen or confronted at Dartmouth at the institutional and/or community level. Each group then looked over a list of common community concerns that included: academics, body image, bullying, cultural inclusivity, financial inclusivity, hazing, high risk drinking, mental health, sexual violence, traditions, unhealthy relationships, and a lack of balance.

DLAB Leadership For Others, Part I

Participants came to session 4, titled “Leadership for Others,” having ranked the top values of the Dartmouth community. This differed from participants’ individual values, as the focus of the reflection was to consider how the College is perceived as a whole. Participants wrote the top 5 values on Post-It notes and then worked together to group the values in thematic buckets. In my group, the themes that emerged included personal growth, community, and achievement.

Following this activity, participants discussed what experiences they have had, as well as experiences they did not have, that led them to pick those particular values. In an effort to compare perceived values to the values the College wishes to uphold, participants then read through the Dartmouth Mission Statement. Participants discussed whether or not they believe Dartmouth upholds these values; one participant “graded” Dartmouth on each point.

DLAB Leadership With Others

The third session of D-LAB on January 30, 2017 was titled “Leadership With Others.” This session shifted from focusing on individual’s values to how these values interact with the surrounding communities. Prior to this session, participants had close friends select the five values they thought best described them. The session began with participants discussing in pairs whether the values their friends chose matched the values participants chose for themselves. This conversation allowed participants to reflect on how their values may be seen by others within different social and academic contexts.

The group then came together as a whole to discuss the quote by Jim Rohn, “You are the average of the five people you spend the most time with.” Specifically, our group talked about how this quote was more applicable in high school, when one’s family was the people one spent the most time with; however, in college, the five people one spends the most time with may be incredibly different individuals from a variety of places on campus.  

DLAB Leadership From Within: Part 2

The second session of D-LAB was titled “Leadership From Within (Part II)” and proceeded to build off of session one. A unique aspect of D-LAB is that participants are asked to complete bridge activities in between each session to encourage reflection throughout the week and prepare for the following session. The bridge activity for the past week was to rank values that were most and least important to participants. This prepared participants to consider how their individual values influence their daily activities and future goals.

Following icebreakers and casual dinner conversation, participants wrote down their top 3 values on post-it notes. The group as a whole then discussed the chosen values and highlighted the overlaps among the group. Students then paired off to explain more about how their values were shaped by their personal life experiences, and why they identified with those specific values. The pairs then shared with the group as a whole; it was interesting to note the pairs that had matching important values, and those that had opposite most important and least important values.

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